Articles Posted in Criminal Law

The court determined that the law prohibiting secret recordings of phone calls covers parties to a call as well as third parties who are eavesdropping on it.


Ballot measures intended to reform policing and other criminal justice changes gained approval in many jurisdictions last week.


Posted in: Criminal Law

Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel has filed felony charges against Jacob Wohl and Jack Burkman based on a robocalling program that they operated in August.


A teen in Tampa, Florida, is accused of taking over the Twitter accounts of Barack Obama, Bill Gates, Elon Musk, and other celebrities.


Posted in: Criminal Law
Tagged: bitcoin, Twitter

The proposed law would criminalize the use or possession of cell phones by Vermont residents who are under 21.


On Tuesday, December 10, 2019, the Superior Court of Pennsylvania ruled against actor Bill Cosby in his appeal to overturn three counts of aggravated indecent assault. Cosby and his lawyers presented eight (8) grounds for appeal. The appeal was denied in a nintey-four (94) page order, written by President Judge Emeritus, John T. Bender.


Posted in: Appeals, Criminal Law

Detroit police plan to use facial recognition technology to help investigate allegations of home invasions and certain violent crimes, despite concerns over accuracy and fairness.


On Wednesday, June 5, 2019, the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit held that Washington State police officers lacked reasonable suspicion to arrest Daniel Brown after the police received an anonymous report of a black man possessing a gun in Washington, a concealed-carry state. After the police received the anonymous report, the police saw Brown, activated their police lights, and then pursued him going the opposite direction down a one-way street. Brown ran for about a block before being arrested at gunpoint. Police found a gun in Brown's waistband, prompting a further search finding drugs and cash. The Ninth Circuit found that the officers lacked reasonable suspicion of criminal activity when they stopped and frisked Brown and, thus, granted Brown's motion to suppress the evidence of drugs and cash.


Immigrants in California can still be deported if they were convicted of a crime involving marijuana before voters approved the legalization of the drug in 2016.


Connecticut motorist Jason Stiber claimed that he was eating a McDonald's hash brown when police gave him a ticket for distracted driving last year.


Posted in: Criminal Law