Articles Posted in Internet Law

The federal appeals court allowed the FCC to continue giving internet service providers substantial discretion to control the way in which consumers access the internet.


Tech giant Google faces scrutiny from state attorneys general and the federal Justice Department for potential violations related to online searches, advertising, and Android products.


Operators of websites on which users advertise firearms for sale are not legally responsible for illegal sales and resulting injuries or deaths.


The Court's decision in a battle over basic software codes will end a decade of litigation between the two tech companies and shape the future of the software industry.


Rather than suing hacking websites directly, Facebook is suing the companies that provide hosting services for these websites, alleging trademark infringement and cybersquatting.


Led by New York State Attorney General Letitia James, the attorneys general of eight states and the District of Columbia will investigate Facebook for possible violations of antitrust laws. The investigation arises from concerns over the dominance of Facebook in its industry, and it will examine whether Facebook may be restricting the choices available to consumers.


The technology giant could face billions of dollars in damages after a panel of federal judges allowed a class action lawsuit by Illinois users to move forward.


In the aftermath of a March 2019 Capital One data breach that reportedly compromised the data of over 100 million Capital One customers and credit card applicants, plaintiffs are suing not only the credit card company but also the software development platform where the alleged perpetrator posted information about the breach. The hack is said to have exposed the social security numbers, bank account numbers, and credit card applications of millions of people in the US and Canada.


On Tuesday, July 9, 2019, the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit held that President Donald J. Trump engaged in unconstitutional viewpoint discrimination, in violation of the First Amendment, by blocking certain users' access to his Twitter account based on those users' speech on Twitter. The Knight First Amendment Institute at Columbia University sued the President on behalf of seven Twitter users who were blocked from the President's Twitter account after said users tweeted replies to the President critical of his personality and policies. Judge Barrington D. Parker concluded "that the First Amendment does not permit a public official who utilizes a social media account for all manner of official purposes to exclude persons from an otherwise-open online dialogue because they expressed views with which the official disagrees."


On Thursday, April 25, 2019, Facebook, Inc.  and Instagram, LLC filed a lawsuit in the United States District Court for the Northern District of California against Social Media Series Limited, a New Zealand company, and three other individual defendants for selling fake engagement services to Instagram users. The complaint alleges that the defendants sold fake likes, views, and followers to Instagram users as a service. Facebook and Instagram suspended the defendants' accounts and then warned them formally, in writing, to notify defendants that they were violating Instagram's Terms of Use and Community Guidelines. The defendants continued to violate Instagram's Terms of Use and Community Guidelines, which resulted in the lawsuit.