Articles Posted in Internet Law

Tech industry groups argue that the law violates the Constitution by exposing social media companies to potential fines and lawsuits based on their application of content moderation rules.


The tech giant and the luxury designer are alleging claims based on breach of contract and intellectual property infringement.


The recently implemented California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) and the recently passed Virginia Consumer Data Protection Act have policymakers and regulators gearing up for more state legislation and potential federal input.


A proposed state law would require app store operators such as Apple and Google to allow app developers to use their own payment processing systems, thus avoiding fees for the use of systems provided by app stores.


Companies with $100 million or more in global annual gross revenue would need to pay a percentage of the revenue received from digital advertisements shown in Maryland.


Virginia is poised to become the second state in the country to adopt a comprehensive online data protection law for consumers.


A federal judge found that the social network had not provided adequate evidence to support its complaint of antitrust and other business violations by hosting provider Amazon Web Services.


This decision could guide many other courts across the U.S. in determining whether strict liability as a retailer or distributor should apply to online marketplaces like Amazon.


On Tuesday, October 13, 2020, the United States Supreme Court denied a petition for a writ of certiorari in Malwarebytes, Inc. v. Enigma Software Group USA, LLC. The high court appeal stems from a case wherein Malwarebytes used software to block its users from accessing products from its competitor, Enigma. The district court rejected Enigma's claim based on immunity provided by Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act. The Ninth Circuit panel reversed the district court's ruling, stating that "[i]mmunity under that section does not extend to anticompetitive conduct." Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas penned a concurring opinion to the denial of certiorari, suggesting that a review of Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act may be warranted in an appropriate case.


The Arizona Board of Regents is suing in federal court to shut down an Instagram account that uses ASU trademarks in spreading misinformation about the coronavirus.