Articles Posted in Uncategorized

On Monday, April 27, 2020, in Georgia v. Public.Resource.Org, Inc., the United States Supreme Court ruled that annotations accompanying the Official Code of Georgia Annotated were not protected under copyright law. In a 5-4 decision, the Supreme Court ruled in favor of Public.Resource.Org, a nonprofit company devoted to public access to government records and legal materials.


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On Friday, January 17, 2020, a three-judge panel in the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit reversed and remanded a climate change lawsuit brought by Our Children's Trust against the federal government. The panel reversed the district court's interlocutory orders and remanded the case to the district court with instructions to dismiss the case for lack of standing. The lawsuit involves 21 young people who allege climate-change related injuries caused by the federal government's "permit[ting], authoriz[ing], and subsidiz[ing] fossil fuel."


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A disability rights group has filed a lawsuit against the City of San Diego and three companies, including private e-scooter companies Bird and Lime, for allegedly breaching the Americans with Disabilities Act and other related state legislation. The class-action lawsuit, Montoya et al v. City of San Diego et al, argues that the city has failed to uphold its duty of keeping city sidewalks, ramps, crosswalks, and other public areas clear of dispersed scooters, which can create hazardous situations for people with physical disabilities.


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Judge John D. Bates of the Federal District Court for the District of Columbia upheld his previous order to bring back the Obama-era program, stating that the Trump administration had not justified its elimination.


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When Laura Murray was 10 years old, she received a small glass vial containing light-gray dust from an old friend of her father’s: Neil Armstrong. The vial was paired with a note that said “To Laura Ann Murray — Best of Luck — Neil Armstrong Apollo 11.” Laura, who’s now Laura Cicco, found the vial years later in her parents' home after they had passed away. The note has since been authenticated by a handwriting expert to belong to Neil Armstrong. Cicco filed the lawsuit against NASA to get ahead of any potential legal issues since the space agency has a history of confiscating suspected lunar material from citizens.