Articles Tagged with class action

Fifteen plaintiffs and two nonprofit organizations have filed a new class action lawsuit seeking improvement of what is reported to be severely inadequate healthcare in Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detention facilities. Filed by the Southern Poverty Law Center, the Civil Rights Education and Enforcement Center, Disability Rights Advocates, and the law firm of Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe, the lawsuit does not seek money damages, but instead requests that ICE closely track these conditions and improve healthcare at its facilities.


The technology giant could face billions of dollars in damages after a panel of federal judges allowed a class action lawsuit by Illinois users to move forward.


In the aftermath of a March 2019 Capital One data breach that reportedly compromised the data of over 100 million Capital One customers and credit card applicants, plaintiffs are suing not only the credit card company but also the software development platform where the alleged perpetrator posted information about the breach. The hack is said to have exposed the social security numbers, bank account numbers, and credit card applications of millions of people in the US and Canada.


In a new ruling, Judge Dana Sabraw has given the federal government six months to locate children separated from their families at the border under the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" immigration policy. Though many of the more than 2000 children the government took from their families have since been reunited pursuant to a June 2018 court order, reports indicate that there may be thousands more children that are currently unaccounted for. 


Recently, a group of women filed a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) against Facebook, arguing that the social media platform and certain companies posting ads on it have engaged in gender discrimination. These companies used Facebook to advertise positions in occupations such as the trucking industry, but they allegedly…


A federal district court judge in Illinois has granted preliminary approval to a settlement between State Farm and a class of plaintiffs claiming that the insurance giant created a RICO enterprise to bankroll the election of a judge to the state's high court. Illinois Supreme Court Justice Lloyd Karmeier was elected in 2004, and in 2005 voted to overturn a $1.05 billion verdict against the insurer stemming from breach of contract claims regarding its alleged use of non-original parts in vehicles damaged in accidents. State Farm will not admit liability through the recently-proposed settlement, but will pay $250 million to class members. 


A lawsuit seeking class action status has recently been filed against Google after the tech company admitted to tracking the location history of even users who have turned off location services.


Last week, the California Supreme Court ruled that in order for gig economy companies like Dynamex Operations West, Lyft, and Uber to classify their workers as contractors, they must prove that their workers are, in fact, running their own businesses.


Posted in: Employment Law

Google has reportedly spent approximately $270,000 to close unexplained pay gaps it identified among over 200 employees in six job groups. As part of this effort to close any "statistically significant" pay inequities, Google reviewed any job group with 30 or more employees, and at least five employees in every demographic group for which it had data. The pay increases occurred following a revised class action that was filed against the search giant earlier this year, alleging that women make less than their male counterparts at Google.


Attorneys behind the lawsuit believe the detentions are part of an effort by the Trump administration to pressure Vietnam into abandoning a repatriation agreement prohibiting the return of Vietnamese immigrants who arrived in the U.S. before the two countries reestablished diplomatic relations in 1995. Read the complaint on Justia.


Posted in: US Immigration